WTTF (working towards the future): College Club–Video Essay

I found doing this project extremely challenging—more because of my skill level in terms of crafting a video then for anything else; however, probably as a result of my nascent technical skill level I was not quite sure how to add some of the more complex argument techniques that I would normally like to include in a typical paper essay. For example, I would have liked to frame my position within a discourse. By this I mean, I would have liked to have acknowledge some of the potential difficulties with my position—counter arguments at the most rudimentary level—in order to both anticipate and assuage concerns and to further exfoliate my argument. Additionally, even thought the video essay makes the texts seem multi-dimensional in a sensorial manner, my lack of knowledge or creativity seemed to flatten out what I believe is a dynamic argument. In many ways the multi-sensorial nature placed heavy precedence on pathos, which can, and I believe did in this case, compromise the legitimacy of my argument. While I place myself as a central figure of inquiry in this essay, and some might say this is why the excessive sense of pathos, I would argue that on the page I could have done the same thing without having such an overwhelming affect. It is something about the visual image that erodes implication, making elements that would otherwise be nuanced a bit more hard-hitting. Again I realize that this probably has much to do with my inexperience, but nonetheless it is a fascinating point of comparison.

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3 Comments

October 1, 2013 · 4:31 am

3 responses to “WTTF (working towards the future): College Club–Video Essay

  1. I really enjoyed your video and maybe its because I am bias as a first generation college student as someone who was involved in classes and clubs like AVID to gain navigational tools to attend a university. I found the personal testimonies of the students to be very powerful as they discussed what they learn through the club because they did not have access to the information prior to joining. I also enjoyed your personal narrative as it situates you and your children into the larger narrative of the accessibility of higher education and who has access.

  2. Watching your video today, I was reminded of how my old high school treated those students who planned to attend a community college after high school. Really, it was worse to be to going to Chaffey (chafe my balls) or Mt. San Antonio (mount my sack) than to be foregoing college altogether.

    How does this work today, at your own school? I know I regret how misinformed I was about community college as a legitimate option. I was shocked when I learned how much easier it is for a 4.0 student at a community college to transfer to, say, UCLA than it is for the same 4.0 high school senior to be admitted as an incoming freshman.

    Are high school students today aware of this?

  3. Melissa: I think your comments about pathos are really important, but is this a problem really? You do this hard work for kids because you care about them, and the investment is both political and personal (and emotional). Caring about these kids is a way to get people to act (and then also think).
    Then, I think your questions are your position are critical: you attempted to address this with your personal story up front, and that’s a great start. I think we could talk about other strategies to write your voice and positionality into these representations (or take it out altogether) with methods that would not feel so bifurcated: part 1/part 2. In fact, this will be the main focus of our reading and thinking about documentary/ethnography film. So let’s put “a pin on it.”

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